Where’s the Beef?

Where’s the beef???  In Mom’s freezer and, pretty soon, in my tummy!!!!

Mom and I went camping with our Texas cowpoke friends in Missouri a bit ago.  I love the fella, Mr. John.  Those are his feet that I am cuddling up to in the photo to the left.  He knows just where and how to pet me.  As for the lady, Miss Carol, I worship her.  She always has a pocketful of my favorite cookies, and she loves to dole them out to me piece by piece.  It is a lovely game.

Better yet, Miss Carol transferred half a dozen packages of ground cow from her freezer to ours.  She knows I am on a special diet and wanted to contribute to my good health and longevity with beef straight from their personal herd.  Mom says it is magic meat and will probably get me at least through Christmas.  Not bad for a sick old girl that she had all but written off a few short months ago, eh?

Mr. John says that I look great and that Mom is just overreacting to stuff the vets told her.  I really like how that guy thinks.  I also totally agree with him, but I am not letting on.  I am enjoying all the special treatment I’ve been getting, especially the home-cooked diet.

Anyways, we had a great time together.  Lots of walks and visits.  Mr. John and Miss Carol’s house-on-wheels is bigger than ours.  We all fit in there just fine and nobody stepped on me once, though I have to admit I tried my best to trip Miss Carol a couple of times when she was on her way from one spot to another carrying food.  Even if I couldn’t get her to drop what she was carrying, I was hopeful more cookies would spill from her pockets if she went down.  I suppose it is just as well that I did not succeed.  Something tells me that Mom would have banished my old bones from our get-togethers should I not be on her definition of good behavior.

One day we spent a couple of hours outside and, for the life of me, I couldn’t figure out what the big deal was.  Mom and our friends were trying to see something funny that was happening up in the sky.  They put weird, dark glasses on their faces and stared up at the sun.  Silly people.  Don’t they know that will give you a headache?  Things did get funky for a while, though, when the sky, trees, and grass all shifted to deeper, cooler shades, the cicadas stopped singing and end-of-the day critter songs took up the oddly-slacking chorus.  But it didn’t last long, and I knew all was well with the world when the cookies and walks resumed.

Our friends didn’t just treat me really special on this visit.  They were super nice to my Mom, too.  Mom had a birthday while we were together and they spoiled her even more than they spoiled me!  That’s all right.  Even Moms deserve a little spoiling now and then.

Back to me.  I was really sad when our visit ended.  Mom and I rolled out of the campground and she told me that our friends were going to head back to their ranch in Texas.  I cried and whined for a bit, then I took a long nap.  Everything looked better when I woke up, even though my ears hurt because Mom was howling (she calls it singing) along with the radio.  Mom says we will get to see these friends again in just a few short months and, before then, we will get to see other people that we love.  Meanwhile, I can enjoy the gift that is in our freezer and–to get to the real meat of the matter–I can relish the memories of all our good times.  So many, many good times.

Yes.  Dogs have great memories.

Especially me.

(Note from Mom to all scientifically-minded readers out there:  The picture of the eclipse included above–taken with a simple i-phone and no filter–shows the brightness of the eclipsed sun (around 98%) at the bottom of the photo.  How many observant eyes noted the curious crescent shape above and to the right?  Somehow, the eclipsed sun’s reflection ended up in those clouds, masquerading as a crescent moon.  Please explain.  Because I cannot.  Feel free to use the comments section so that others can see your explanation.  The prize will be another mystery-puzzle based on a ground photo taken around the same time.  So, come on people, make an educated–or intuitive–guess!)

Oh-Hi-Oh

Dawny (she says hello!) and I are on vacation.  We are taking the month of August off from our workamping duties to roll around the middle parts of our beautiful country.

We have greatly enjoyed our recent travels through Ohio, and this post is offered to give a short review of three Ohio state parks.  Everyone’s camping/RV park preferences vary widely.  Dawny and I love state parks the best.  There is usually plenty of space to take long walks.  Often lakes and/or rivers are involved, which enhances the beauty and the “my-oh-my!” factor by several satisfied sighs or so.

Many state parks, including the three discussed in this post, do not offer much beyond electric hookup, but that is fine by us.  We operate off of our tanks and fill up and dump when we arrive/leave.  The parks listed here range from $26 to $28 per night.  While that is on the high side for me, it is still better than parks in Pennsylvania and Virginia which are well into the $30’s for simple electric hookup.

Beyond the price, Dawny and I place great value on the beauty of our surroundings as we take our many walks (bingo Ohio!) and the overall upkeep and cleanliness of the premises (kudos to Ohio state park maintenance teams).  Oh, and I do require a good Verizon connection for my internet and at least a couple of TV channels to keep from going totally bonkers inside of the silence in my head (Dawny couldn’t care less).  All three parks met these basic requirements.

Here are the three Ohio State Parks that rate high on our list from this trip, starting with our favorite:

Harrison Lake State Park, Fayette, Ohio (link:  parks.ohiodnr.gov/harrisonlake):  I love it when the campground is on or within easy walking distance of the loveliness that gives a park its name.  The campground at Lake Harrison is perched uphill from the lake and, while most of the camping sites don’t enjoy a lake view, it is a comfortable stroll away.  For campers with children, playground equipment is scattered throughout the park and camping loops.  There is a swimming  beach, although one day I noted the “white” water from children’s splashing was tinted bright green/blue due to lake algae–swimmers beware!  They even have a dog beach (non-fenced), which Dawny enjoyed surveying from a respectful distance.  Poor dear hates water.  Perhaps wise, given the algae situation.

The campground was kept immaculately clean and the entire park was beautifully tended.  Considering my recent Lyme Disease struggle, I truly appreciate all those conscientious lawn-mowing souls.  It seemed that as soon as a camper vacated their site, staff/workampers were on the spot cleaning up.

On the most mundane yet critical of notes, whereas the two other parks in this post have vault toilets to supplement their single bath house/flush toilets, Harrison Lake’s North Campground has flush toilets located in the camping loops.  (Note:  This is not the case in the smaller South Campground, which still has vault toilets.)  I have to admit that long ago I left the rough camping years of my youth way far in the distant, barely remembered hinterlands eons and miles, ages and galaxies behind me.  I now prefer certain creature comforts.  A flush-toilet and a warm shower with lots of good water pressure so that I don’t have to worry about conserving the water from my on-board water tank are high on that list.  Thank you, Harrison Lake!

Mosquito Lake State Park, Cortland, Ohio (link:  parks.ohiodnr.gov/mosquitolake):  The feature that impressed me the most about this park was the dog park/beach.  And I don’t even have a dog that likes water or can enter a dog park if another dog is in it (she would try to eat him/her).  It was very refreshing after being in Pennsylvania, which tended to have entire areas totally off-limits to dogs, to be in a park that granted a big chunk of valuable lake-side real estate to it’s canine visitors, fenced it in, and then plotted out a bit of beach area (buoys and all) for those intrepid four-legged guests who enjoy a good splash.

The fine-print caveat to this apparent pet-friendliness is that Ohio state parks have a two-pet limit.  I have a good friend who travels with two dogs and two cats.  If you ask me, cats shouldn’t count against that limit as long as they are not outside being walked with their doggies in a fur-coated gaggle-gang.  Really now, how often is that going to happen?  Never!  Can you imagine the twisted leashes and bruised/scratched egos and legs and other body parts?  I asked at the office about that policy, and they said that if you call ahead and describe the members of your menagerie, an exception can be made.  (P.S.  I met a camp host at the park who had three cats.  Three.  Wicked.  Cats.  Just sayin’…  God, I love my dog.)

As for the two-legged guests, this is a really beautiful park.  Mature, tall trees provide shade to most of the camping sites.  Compared to the other two parks in this post, the sites were spacious and the roads very accomodating to bigger RV rigs.  The only downside would be that there is only one shower house/flush toilet location for over 230 sites.  Otherwise, people need to rely on their own household plumbing (take care of those tanks upon entering/exiting!) or the vault toilets located in the campground loops.

Findley State Park, Wellington, Ohio (link:  parks.ohiodnr.gov/findley):  Smack in the middle of north-central Ohio, Findley State Park is a very convenient stop-over on your trek from wherever to wheresoever, should it happen to be on your path.  Like many other Ohio state parks, there is only one shower house/flush toilet location, in this case serving over 250 camping sites.  A few vault toilets are located elsewhere in the camping loops.  Big rigs, beware.  Many of the sites are fairly short and some are quite sloped.  For my shorter rig (25 feet with no toad) it worked out fine and was a welcome stop between eastern and western Ohio.

That’s it for Ohio this trip.  Afterwards, Dawny and I visited Elkhart, Indiana and got our annual honey-do list done.  Thank you, Phoenix USA (link:  www.phoenixusarv.com) and Doug for putting up with all of our questions and for keeping our little house-on-wheels rolling smoothly along.

We are now meandering towards Missouri to join two dear friends for a camping get-together that serendipitously coincides with the upcoming full solar eclipse.  We will be somewhere around the 98th percentile-coverage point.  Cool, eh!?!?  I just think it’s cool Dawny and I will be basking in it together with these particular friends.  They are two of our favorite people.  And, while they like me plenty, they adore Dawny.  Which is as it should be.

Doing Sick Solo

So… about that stupid joke at the end of my last post…  Well, I got bit all right.  Not by a bear, thank goodness.  By a tick.  I usually save the bodies, wrapping them in a little paper with a date on it.  Then I freeze them, just in case I have to get them tested one day.  The latest addition to my tick morgue is dated 6/1-6/3/17, one month before I came down with classic early Lyme Disease symptoms:  fever bouncing between 101 and 104, headache that painkillers wouldn’t touch, chills, extreme fatigue, rash, etc.  I got better after six days.  Six days after that, I was sick again.  Then better.  Then sick.

I thought this would be a good time to share some thoughts and tips for others who might find themselves in a similar situation:  sick, solo, and away from home.  As a full-time RV traveler, my actual home is always with me, so it might be more accurate to say away from family.  In any case, most of what I have to contribute would apply whether you are on the road or stationary.

You are your own best (and only?) advocate.  I am grateful that a friend reminded me of this early on.  It helped give me the spirit and strength to wrestle with the doctor who saw me at the local urgent care clinic during the first spell of sickness.  Yes, I wrestled with a doctor.  Read on.

You know your body best.  This was different from any flu virus I had ever had before.  I also recognized a rash on my chest as out of the ordinary, including a faint “bullseye” pattern that the literature associates strongly with Lyme’s.  I took a picture of it and showed it to the doctor.  He barely looked at it before quickly dismissing it as just red, ugly, splotchy, old lady skin.  Ok, so he didn’t really say the words “ugly” and “old lady,” but I heard them all the same.  The rash disappeared along with the first batch of flu-like illness.

Take notes, in writing!  Don’t rely on your memory.  There is no such thing as a reliable mental note after the age of 33.  During my doctor visit, they took blood to test for Lyme Disease.  I asked the doctor how I would know if I might have Lyme’s even if the test came back negative (false negatives are very common in the early stages).  He said I wouldn’t get better.  I wrote that down.  The test, indeed, came back negative.

Research, research, research.  And take more notes.  Since I spent so much of my adult life in Virginia, I already knew about the dangers of Lyme Disease, especially when not treated early.  When I felt up to it, I got on the computer and googled (I love you, Google!) for more on early symptoms, late symptoms, tests, and treatment. Consistently, the information warned against letting the disease get established in your system without treating it early, even without a positive blood test result.  It also confirmed my symptoms as highly consistent with early stage Lyme’s.

With all due respect, do not back down…  Wrestle if you must!  When I got sick again six days after the first bout, I called the doctor to ask for a prescription for the antibiotic used against Lyme Disease.  He refused.  He said it could be a hundred other things.  I responded that my symptoms tracked very much with early Lyme’s, including the point he made during my office visit that I would not get better from the initial virus-like symptoms.  He said I didn’t have the rash.  I responded that yes, I did… remember the ugly picture?  He said there was no proof I had been bitten by a tick.  I reminded him that almost one month prior to becoming ill, I had a tick latch on for at least 48 hours.  He said he would “mollify” me by prescribing one week’s worth of antibiotics.  I responded that one week would do no good since proper treatment required one month’s worth.  He finally relented.  Yay.

When you can, DO.  I felt better after throwing up, which usually happened in the morning.  So that is when I would get critical stuff done (rather than climbing back into bed, which is what I really wanted to do), like emptying the RV’s waste tanks, adding to the fresh water tank, shopping, and preparing batches of Dawny’s home-cooked meals ahead of time.  Luckily, my workamping job here is very simple and flexible and I was able to do the minimum to get by.

While you are well, prepare for when you are not.  A list of emergency contacts should be placed in several obvious locations (wallet, glove compartment, fanny-pack if you hike with one).  As a workamper, I give my emergency contacts to the office or head ranger when I arrive at each new job.  I also try to let someone there know how to access my RV in an emergency, which is especially important if you have a pet and/or are unconscious inside.  Make sure your emergency contacts know of each other and have each other’s contact information.  Let them know where your important info is (health insurance card, financial stuff, will, spare keys).

Along similar lines, be a proud, practical squirrel.  RV’ers are supposed to travel as lightly as possible.  Nevertheless, it is important to load up on at least a week’s worth of “sick-supplies” to always have on hand (pain reliever/fever reducer, cough medicine/lozenges, other first-aid basics, ginger ale or whatever helps your nauseous tummy, tea/honey, bread/butter for toast).

Finally, yes, good squirrels save ticks.  Wrap the body of any tick that bites you–especially if it has had a chance to feed for 48 hours–in a dated piece of note paper and file it in a discreet corner of the freezer.  If, after my antibiotic course is finished, I continue to get sick, I now know what to do with that body from early June.  East Stroudsburg University’s Wildlife DNA Laboratory (link:  www.esu.edu/dna) will test that tick for Lyme’s for $50.  It will test for three possible pathogens, depending upon the tick, for $125.  For $175, it will test for all pathogens.  The tick can be from anywhere, not just from Pennsylvania, and even after several years the lab can still conduct the tests.

Thank you for reading.  Wishing all of you good health and tick-less happiness.

(Anyone who would like to contribute a tip on dealing with illness while alone and/or traveling, please feel free to use the comment section.  Keep in mind that each comment needs to be individually approved, so it won’t show up right away.)