Mother Nature & Brazos Bend

As soon as possible after setting up in a new campground, Dawny and I like to get out and explore our surroundings.  While walking through our latest park, Brazos Bend State Park, something odd struck me.  No matter which direction I looked, there was a consistent, straight, perfectly horizontal line on all the trees, bushes, and undergrowth.  Close, far, no matter, the line held true.  Mother Nature isn’t usually that consistent.  She doesn’t often paint in straight lines.  She excels in curves, subtleties, and the beauty of imperfection.

Hurricane Harvey pounded the Texas coast just a little more than four months ago.  Many state parks were closed because of record-breaking flooding and damage, including Brazos Bend State Park southwest of Houston.  The Brazos River crested at 52 feet over flood stage and most of the park (over 5,000 acres) was underwater.

The horizontal line I saw all around me was the high-water mark on the park’s forest and vegetation.  In many places that we walked, I was weighed down with the eerie realization that the line was over my head.

I have included a few photos in this post to try to give you an idea of what it looked like, although a picture can never do the reality justice.  Especially this sort of reality.  Note the pictures that have picnic tables in them and trees nearby to get some perspective on how high the water was.  Tree lines in the distance look like a mist is hovering a few feet above the ground.  That isn’t mist.  It is Harvey’s high water mark.  Park rangers had to get around in boats.

The Texas State Park system, its workers, and many volunteers did an outstanding job getting things back in order so that visitors could come enjoy this park just a few months after such devastation.  They have been busy in quite a number of parks in southeast Texas, and much work remains to be done.

I highly recommend this campground, by the way.  The campsites are paved, spacious, and level.  Large, beautiful trees provide shade to most of the sites.  The roads (two-way) are freshly paved and easy enough for even bigger RV’s to maneuver through.  The park is huge and there are lots of nice places to walk the dog, including a number of trails.

Be sure to keep your doggy on-leash and away from the water, though.  As noted in park instructions in the picture to the left, Brazos Bend’s most popular residents are some of Mother Nature’s most interesting children:  beautiful, subtle, and very dangerous.

(Direct link to Brazos Bend State Park’s website:  https://tpwd.texas.gov/state-parks/brazos-bend.)